From Jalisco to the Great Basin: GBI's Mexico Field Studies Arrives to Reno

Late July 2009, Nogales, Arizona. A hundred meters from the US-Mexico border, in the sweltering, early morning hours of this dusty border town, three Great Basin Institute staff members are gathered at McDonald’s. They haven’t come for breakfast burritos or hash browns. Nor is this a pit stop en route to the next town. This fast food landmark is the destination of a two-day road trip that began at the Institute’s headquarters, in Reno, Nevada. The purpose of the trip? Sixteen Universidad de Guadalajara biology students…

Tropics to the Desert: GBI's Mexico Field Studies Arrives to Reno

It’s the last week of July and one-hundred meters from the U.S.-Mexico border, three of the Great Basin Institute’s staff has gathered in the sweltering early morning hours at a McDonalds in the dusty border town of Nogales, Arizona. They are not here for breakfast burritos or hash browns, nor a general pit-stop on the way to the next town. This fast food landmark is the destination of a two day road trip from the Institute’s headquarters, in Reno, with one purpose: to greet sixteen biology students from the Universidad de Guadalajara, of Mexico, and return them to the foothills…

Lending a Global Hand in Nevada's Backyard

The sun breaks over desert mountains to the east of town. In the University of Nevada, Reno’s north parking lot, a crowd gathers. Gradually, an oblong circle forms around a few men dressed in blue jeans and flip-flops. Moments pass and the crowd grows quiet. One of the men pulls a crumpled slip of paper from his pocket, then recites a line made famous by Edward Abbey: “There are no vacant lots in nature.” With these words, the circle becomes a stream moving toward trucks and vans bulging with backpacks, hand tools, and…