GBI Media Contest August 2020 Submissions, Part 1

Submissions to our August media contest were dramatic, varied, and plentiful. Such was the quality and quantity of this month’s submissions – and so difficult the selection of a winner – that we had a tie for the first time. Not only that, but to keep this Field Update from becoming unwieldy, we’ll be splitting our submission gallery in two.

Above is one of the winning entries, submitted by Research Associate, Laurie Fisher, who writes that “this photo is of the Mt. Charleston fire in July near Las Vegas, NV. I work at Desert National Wildlife Refuge, this was on the way to the Refuge.” This, like a number of our submissions, shows the effects of the fires that are ravaging the west.

Sharon Fee and Tyler Jacobson, Research Associates, Tahoe NF Marking Crew. Our second winner, showing the Loyalton Fire.
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Noah High, Nevada Conservation Corps. That’s My Cow. “A young calf runs in the blazing August heat amid dry brush and grass that could easily catch fire. The glare of the sun emphasizes how easy it is for wildfire to spread in arid Nevada, and with the mountains in the distance, fires can easily move upwards as hot air rushes in.”
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Emily Hassell, Research Associate. “The photo is of Social Media Technician, Alessandra Puig-Santana. The Apple Fire in Riverside County was growing larger by the day, and blowing large amounts of smoke over Joshua Tree National Park. As Social Media Technicians, it is our job to capture photos of events in the park, including this smoke drift – even though the actual fire did not reach the park. I captured this photo of Alessandra photographing the smoke, as winds continued to blow more and more of the ash clouds our way. This photo was taken from Eureka Peak, Joshua Tree National Park.”
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Brian Thornquist, AmeriCorps member. “I’m working with the Santa Rosa District of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest controlling noxious weeds. This past week we have been getting smoke in Paradise Valley, Nevada, from the wildfires in California and Nevada. This photo was taken at sunset in Paradise Valley and shows the lingering smoke from the wildfires blanketing the Santa Rosa Range. The purpose of this photo is to show how smoke from wildfires can compliment landscape photography. Under normal conditions, the Santa Rosa Range is visible. With the hazy conditions that are present in this photo, it creates a different perspective, which is visually appealing and adds depth to this photograph.”
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Maxwell Carter, Nevada Conservation Corps, Trail Crews Leader.

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