GBI Joins The Wildlife Society and American Fisheries Society joint conference in Reno, NV.

From September 29th to October 3rd, Reno, NV played host to the first joint conference of The Wildlife Society and American Fisheries Society. Spread out between the Reno Convention Center and several area hotels, this was the largest gathering of fish and wildlife professionals ever. Indeed, the conference drew around 4,400 participants. As conference organizers explain, this conference provides “[u]nprecedented networking opportunities with … fish and wildlife professionals and students from all 50 states, Canada, Mexico, and countries from around the world, representing every federal agency with a wildlife nexus, major universities, prominent NGOs, and private industry with a vested interest in fish, wildlife and natural resources management.” Given that the conference was held in the city that houses GBI’s main office, we are delighted and proud to have a six Research Associates (three of whom presented posters) and four GBI staff members included among these professionals. Additionally, there was no shortage of GBI alumni in attendance. Here we present some of them, standing proudly (and deservedly so) next to the posters detailing the results of their hard work in the field.

To learn more about the joint conference of The Wildlife Society and American Fisheries Society, visit the official WEBSITE.

Dylan Rhea-Fournier (Great Basin National Park): “Results from a Bioblitz Approach: Rapid Biodiversity Sampling for Chiroptera in Northwestern Nevada”
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Joseph Danielson (Great Basin National Park): “Seasonal Variation in Sex, Age, and Reproductive Condition of Brazilian Free-Tailed Bats at a Migratory Stopover Roost in Eastern Nevada”
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Kelsey Ekholm (Great Basin National Park): “An Overview of Bat Research in the Snake Range”
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Mitchell Stanton (Ash Meadows): “Beetle-mania: Management of a Native Predator in a Refuge Ecosystem”
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Emily Gelzer (University of Wyoming, Former GBI Desert Tortoise RA): “Linking Individual Fidelity to Population Distribution Across Migratory Ungulates”

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