CULTURAL RESOURCE ASSISTANCE

Cultural Resource Surveys. Since August 2008, GBI RAs have worked collaboratively with Lake Mead National Recreational Area staff to conduct archaeological field surveys and site documentation, in addition to laboratory analysis and processing. Site condition assessments are also conducted at previously recorded archeological sites in the Lake Mead in order to monitor disturbances that impact the integrity of these cultural resources and identify threats that may impact them in the foreseeable future.

Archaeologists assist the BLM with closing down dangerous abandoned mines while preserving their historic integrity.

Archaeologists assist the BLM with closing down dangerous abandoned mines while preserving their historic integrity.

Abandoned Mineral Lands. During the early years of mining, little thought was given to what would happen to a mine after its productivity ended. As the years progressed and more people started living in and exploring Nevada, abandoned mines have become a major safety hazard to hikers, off-highway vehicle users, pets and curious individuals. GBI’s Research Associate Program, in partnership with the BLM, conducts cultural resource assessment for the Abandoned Mineral Lands (AML) Program. The goal of the AML archaeology program is to assist the Nevada Division of Minerals in assessing the impacts that the closure of abandoned historic mine hazards may have on cultural resources. The program seeks to strike a balance between keeping people and pets safe and preserving the history of mining in Nevada. GBI’s expert archaeologists address how to make hazards, such as shafts and adits, safer by assessing their archaeology and historical integrity. All assessments are completed in accordance with BLM and State Historic Preservation Office standards. Archival research, historical photographs, literature, and the artifacts surrounding the hazards and their current state of preservation are all taken into account.

GBI archaeologists inventoried the prehistoric and historic resources present in the Soldier Meadows ACEC, part ofthe Black Rock Desert-High Rock Canyon National Conservation Area.

GBI archaeologists inventoried the prehistoric and historic resources present in the Soldier Meadows ACEC, part ofthe Black Rock Desert-High Rock Canyon National Conservation Area.

Soldier Meadows Archaeological Survey. In 2013, in partnership with the BLM, Black Rock Field Office, a GBI Research Associate archaeologist conducted a cultural resource inventory of the Soldier Meadows Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) within the Black Rock Desert-High Rock Canyon Emigrant Trails National Conservation Area (NCA). The survey provided useful data concerning the nature and extent of prehistoric cultures that lived in the area for thousands of years before the modern era, as well as a better understanding of Pioneer use along a two-mile section of the Applegate Lassen Emigrant Trail.

Preserve America Cultural Resource Inventory. In the Spring Mountains NRA in southern Nevada, RAs have helped to implement an inter-agency proposal in support of the Preserve America program with the following activities: (a) identify and evaluate cultural resources, (b) create and implement heritage resource education, outreach and interpretation, (c) consult with and involve pertinent tribes in the Heritage resource program, and (d) implement data management, mitigation, and conservation measures for cultural resources. In order to accomplish these goals, RAs work with Forest Service resource specialists to conduct cultural surveys of prehistoric rock art, 19th Century mining towns, and Euro-American emigrant trails and roads. The RAs then enter survey data into a site database, which will inform the planning and development of new projects on the SMNRA.